Tuesday, January 01, 2013

2012 - The Year in Review

Well, in 2012 I had a dozen short stories published in venues big and small, ranging from professional level (Daily Science Fiction, Buzzy Mag) to non-paying. They were, in chronological order:


"The Centurion and the Rainman" - Buzzy Mag, March 2012
"Encounter in Camelot" - 4 Star Stories, Spring 2012
"Great White Ship" - Daily Science Fiction, May 11, 2012
"Accidental Witness" - Planetary Stories, Spring 2012
"Double Exposure" - Daily Science Fiction, June 11, 2012
"The Starship Theodora" - Nova Science Fiction, Summer 2012
"Pirates of the Ozarks" - Science Fiction Trails No. 8, Fall 2012
"Barsoom Billy" - Science Fiction Trails, No. 9 All Martian Spectacular Fall 2012
"Damascus Interrupted" - Phantasmagorium, Sept. 2012
"The Way of the Heretic" - 4 Star Stories, Fall 2012
"Snow Globe" - Bewildering Stories No. 500 Fall 2012
"The Relic" - Stupefying Stories Dec. 2012

The two stories in Daily Science Fiction, "Great White Ship" and "Double Exposure", were two of the best things I have written, and include some of the best snappiest prose I have ever come up with:


From "Great White Ship":

"You ever been to East Texas? You ever been in an East Texas thunderstorm?"

I shook my head.

"It's like God dumps a big tin bucket of water on top of your head, then drops the bucket over your head, and then he pounds on the bucket."

and also:

"I clicked on my radio. 'Something is just breaking through the clouds, hold on, Billy,' I said. Then I saw it. 'Oh, God!' was all I could mutter. It was like a giant ocean liner parting the clouds only 500 feet above the ground, and lumbering straight towards the main runway. A long, pale cylinder coming at us like the finger of God."

From "Double Exposure":


"Oh, my God!" he thought as he flipped through the photos. "This is the life I could have had!"

Through the photos--as happens with dying men--his life flashed before his eyes, but it was the life he should have had. The birth of their first son. Then their sweet baby girl. Their lovely house. Another son. Kids on bicycles. And on and on.

He began to cry.


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