Saturday, January 27, 2007

"When Hell's Bill Comes Due"

That's the title of my latest story. I made a nice sprint this past week and have finished it up. I will proofread the manuscript Sunday and it's off in the mail Monday.

It's 7,215 words long and probably will probably flop with editors because a crucial plot twist hangs on the acceptance that Jesus was what he said he was. But actually enjoyed writing this one. It's got pirates, a star ship, black holes, and betrayal

Sunday, January 21, 2007

Finished another one

Well, I finished "The Man Who Skinned Schrodinger's Cat" this weekend and its going out in Monday's mail.

My next story is going to be a complete change of pace - set in space, with a strong theological element. I probably began thinking about it over a year and a half ago when I read Michael Burstein's "Sanctuary".

Wednesday, January 17, 2007

Back in the saddle

My carpal tunnel syndrome in the left hand is recovering nicely and I've been able to do some writing every night this week. Monday I finished my latest story, "Money Changer" and sent it off. I'm working now to finish up another tale called "The Man Who Skinned Shrodinger's Cat".

Sunday, January 14, 2007

Funny comments

Blackgate is a web site that does short fiction reviews. In December they reviewed the August issue of the new ezine Heliotrope, which included a review of Ed Morris' short story "On the Air". I ran across the review recently. amd here it is reprinted:

"By far the wackiest story I’ve read recently is “On the Air” by Edward Morris. This is alternate history on speed in which the events of World War I end much differently, as this transcript of a show from the newly invented television illustrates in overwhelming detail. Some stories are jam-packed with adventure; this one is jam packed with historical and literary references. To just give you an idea, Hugo Gernsback is the show’s host. It’s not surprising the story is dedicated to Paul DiFilippo and also Lou Antonelli; Morris might have included Howard Waldrop, as well."

I called Edward last week and told him about the review. I also ran a copy off and mailed it to Howard.

Wednesday, January 10, 2007

Campebell Award

With the start of the new year, they've updated the Writertopia web site which lists the authors eligible for the award.

Someone noticed that and posted a message at the Asimov's discussion board. This is where most of what follows was originally posted:

Since my "A Rocket for the Republic" was published in Asimov's in 2005, I was eligible to be nominated last year. When they listed the results and nominations for the Campbell Award after WorldCon last year, I saw I had five nominations - which rather surprised me, since I don't recall I asked anyone to nominate me.

Living in a small town in East Texas, all by my lonesome so to speak (I'm the only member of the SFWA in my three-digit regional postal zone) I don't belong to any writer's group or critique confab, so I never get a chance to socialize or chat with any s-f type people except when I go to conventions. There must be a lot more gossiping about this kind of stuff in the big cities. I have gone to a few Turkey City Workshops, but I never see these folks otherwise, I live 300 miles away.

Well, from what I know of the writers listed, here's my prediction for this year's ballot:

Brandon Sanderson
Lawrence Schoen
Sarah Monette
Brett Alexander Savory
Justine Larbalestier

My bet is that Monette will be this year's winner. I guess we can check back later and see how close I came with my prediction.

Of course, I have a second year of elibibility, but as few people as I know personally, I know I'd never get on the ballot (the cut-off last year for fifth place was 17 nominations).

But if you were nice enough to nominate me last year, or if you want to write me down again, you have my thanks.

Here's a funny thought (funny peculiar not funny ha-ha) I just turned 50 this past Saturday, January 6, so I bet I'm the OLDEST person on that eligibility list.

Monday, January 01, 2007

My New Year's resolutions

It's trite, but my goal is to lose weight.

After many years of slowly losing weight because of Type II diabetes, I've finally got it under control to the degree that my weight has begun to go up again. My medicine is so good that I get better nutrition from my meals, plus my appetite's increased.

I lost 80 pounds between 1995 and 2004 (this is probably not typical of most Type II diabetics).

So I've begun to make some diet and lifestyle adjustments. The good news is, I'm feeling pretty good.

As far as the genre is concerned, I guess my goal is to get back in my old best groove and write at the Bradbury-esque pace of a story a week (I've done that in the past).

Because of job and other various concerns, I really didn't write anything new in the last quarter of 2005, and I've got a heap of story ideas piled up. Time to whip them into shape and move them out.

Latest reviews

"It’s possible that you haven’t run into the stories of Lou Antonelli. Since 2003, he’s been publishing delightful short tales of alternate history all over the nooks and crannies of the SF world. Thanks to Fantastic Books, we now have 28 of these little gems in one place.

"Many of Antonelli’s stories have an unexpected twist ending. And many of them are what he calls “secret history” stories, which aren’t exactly alternate history—they’re set in our familiar history, but there’s always some element that contemporary observers missed. " - Don Sakers, The Reference Library, Analog July-Aug. 2014

In a spare, swift, convincing narrative style, conveying in a deadpan voice a wide array of sometimes Paranoid suppositions about the world, Antonelli juxtaposes realities with very considerable skill, creating a variety of Alternate Worlds, some of them somewhat resembling the constructions of Howard Waldrop, and making some sharp points about American history, race relations, dreams, and occasional nightmares in which the twentieth century goes wrong. [JC]

---From the Encyclopedia of Science Fiction

A better path develops for a distraught man in “Double Exposure” by Lou Antonelli (debut 6/11 and reviewed by Frank D). Jake is about to end it all. He has been trying to keep his high maintenance wife happy for decades and has needed to embezzle to satisfy her spending habits. Now, on the verge of indictment and abandoned by his spouse, he buys a gun. Before he pulls the trigger, he spies a Kodak one-day photo hut. Curious, he pulls up to the window. They are holding pictures of him and his last girlfriend from 30 years before. The package is a lot thicker than it should be.

Double Exposure” is listed as an Alternative History story but I would classify it as a Magical Realism tale. It is set as a second chance tale, a look into a life that should have been. The author is inspired by his memories of the old photo huts (I remember them) and of their disappearance. A cool idea (photos of another life), one that I could imagine would make for a great anthology.

- Frank Dutkiewicz, Diabolical Plots

Great White Ship”: A traveler stuck waiting for a flight strikes up a conversation with an old airline employee. The Old Timer tells him a story of a Great White Airship that arrives from a most unusual destination. The story of a craft from an alternate reality and how it got there is only the precursor to the final act.

This is one of my favorite stories from this site. I have a great passion for lighter-than-air craft and their potential as a future means of transport, which opens the story. The author uses this speculation to launch into an engaging tale. As fascinating as the main story line is, the alternate history premise that accompanies it is just as worthwhile. This story was well written and very well thought out. It is well worth the read.

Recommended.

- James Hanzelka, Diabolical Plots

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